Media Archive Dossier-Secret Airshow
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Archive#: TC-001

Security Level: 2

Media Class: Yellow

Format: Private VHS

#Copies: 1

Duration: Approx. 70 minutes

Archive Location: Thompson Media Research and Archive Center, Unit 2B, St. Louis, Missouri.

History: TC-001 was recovered from Project Memories, a Library of Congress initiative to collect and archive family home videos in 2000. TC-001 was discovered among a collection of airshow recordings, which were submitted anonymously. Of these tapes, only TC-001 was of particular interest to the Authority, although all of the tapes were confiscated and archived at the Thompson Center.

Description: TC-001 is a VHS home video cassette simply labeled "airshow". The cassette features footage from at least two different airshows.

The first 40 minutes of the tape show footage taken from an airshow on ██, 1992. The footage is presumed to be taken using a standard home video camera. The name of the airshow is unknown, and it is believed to be some kind of secret event. The reasons for this conclusion include:

1. Aircraft of unknown design and origin.

2. Numerous and repeated violations of standard airshow safety protocol for 1992.

3. A lack of tail numbers and other identifying markings on featured aircraft.

4. A complete lack of availability of information concerning the airshow or its location.

4. The last clip of the first airshow on the cassette, in which a security employee appears to confiscate the camera.

5. The circumstantial link to the second airshow featured on the tape.

Unusual or anomalous events recorded in the first portion of the tape are described below:

Time Stamp Event
00:06:07 A demonstration pilot flying a Tiger Moth makes an extremely low pass over the crowd of spectators. The airshow announcer makes no comment on the severe danger.
00:10:45 Footage of a static outdoor display of unknown design. The airplane, presumed to be a bomber, vaguely resembles the B-2 Spirit, but has Soviet markings.
00:14:35 Static outdoor display of what appears to be a primitive attack helicopter gunship prototype. Markings indicate German air force during World War II.
00:21:37 A pilot flying a Hawker Hurricane demonstrates a live-fire strafing run using a remotely operated Korean War era Jeep as the target.
00:27:01 A pilot flying a Supermarine Spitfire conducts a simulated strafing run of the crowd of spectators, using blank powder charges. The demonstration includes the detonation of small explosives in dangerous proximity to the crowds and concludes with the dropping of a flour bomb into the crowd by dive-bombing.
00:32:08 Static hangar display of bizarre aircraft that includes a balloon envelope and a rotary wing. A sign identifies the craft as an experimental aircraft from the early 20th century called the "DF-409". Analyses by Authority engineers has determined that the design should not be able to fly, despite a claim by the sign that it was used for reconnaissance by the United States Navy.
00:34:26 By now it is night. A team of engineers demonstrates a high-altitude rocket launch of unknown purpose.
00:36:54:00 Demonstration of a remotely-piloted airplane capable of transforming mid flight into the design of a dragonfly, with the ability to hover like an insect.
00:41:23 A man dressed as a security guard or police officer approaches the person holding the camera and asks what he is doing. The footage of the 1992 airshow then ends.

The 1992 footage is followed by clips from another unknown airshow, this time in silent black and white and presumably having been recorded during the early days of powered flight. The show takes place in a field rather than an airport. Based on the appearance and dress of many spectators, the show is assumed to be in Japan, although many Caucasian spectators and pilots are shown as well. The footage features several aircraft of unknown and often bizarre design, with many aircraft reminiscent of early steampunk designs. It is still a mystery how some of the designs are able to fly for sustained periods, and at least one is a known design that had officially been reported unable to fly.

A particularly notable scene in the footage is when two biplanes of unknown design engage in what appears to be a live-fire dogfight, with the loosing craft being shot down and crashing. Careful analyses of the footage has determined that neither this scene nor any of the rest of the show was created using models or special effects.

It is unknown if the two airshows are directly related, but the mysterious circumstances lead the Authority to believe so. At one point during the 1992 footage, the airshow announcer mentions the show as being held annually over several decades.

Appendix A: The only aircraft which could be positively identified in the footage is an unremarkable B-17 at the 1992 show. The nose art identifies the bomber as the "███ ███". The organization that owns the ███ ███ disavows any knowledge of the 1992 show and claims to have had possession of the B-17 since the 1960s. Examination of the organization's records and files has turned up no useful information.

Appendix B: On ███████, 2010, Task Force █ examined an abandoned airport of medium size in █████. The airport has been closed since the 1970s. Based on comparisons with the TC-001 footage, it is highly likely that the airport was where the 1992 footage was taken. Task Force agents discovered a ruined and illegible program for an airshow, what appeared to be an admission ticket, a ruined poster, a room containing some makeshift fair stalls and tables, and a box containing misc. promotional items from a defunct business venture called ██████.

Appendix C:The security guard has since been identified as an employee of █████ Solutions, which has since been renamed ███████. ███████ is a private security firm that routinely staffs airshows and other public events and is a wholly-owned subsidiary of ███████ ███████, a company that often hosts or sponsors public events. ███████ has a dubious legal history, with several employee arrests, fines, investigations, lawsuits, injunctions, and two bankruptcies (for a complete list of legal and equitable actions involving ███████ and its parent company, see Document █).

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